Sexual Violence in History: A Bibliography

compiled by Stefan Blaschke

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Alphabetical Index

+ Author Index

+ Speaker Index


Chronological Index

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Geographical Index

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Topical Index

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Start: Topical Index: Representations: Literary Texts: Ancient Literature: Ancient Roman Literature:

Representations: Literary Texts:
OVID

General

I n f o r m a t i o n

»Publius Ovidius Naso (Latin: [ˈpuːbliʊs ɔˈwɪdiʊs ˈnaːso(ː)]; 21 March 43 BC – AD 17/18), known in English as Ovid (/ˈɒvɪd/ OV-id), was a Roman poet who lived during the reign of Augustus. He was a younger contemporary of Virgil and Horace, with whom he is often ranked as one of the three canonical poets of Latin literature. The Imperial scholar Quintilian considered him the last of the Latin love elegists. Although Ovid enjoyed enormous popularity during his lifetime, the emperor Augustus exiled him to Tomis, the capital of the newly-organised province of Moesia, on the Black Sea, where he remained for the last nine or ten years of his life. Ovid himself attributed his banishment to a "poem and a mistake", but his reluctance to disclose specifics has resulted in much speculation among scholars.« -- More information: Wikipedia


K e y w o r d s

I. Chronological Index: Ancient History: Roman History | II. Geographical Index: European History: Italian History


B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Amsler, Mark. »Rape and silence. Ovid s mythography and medieval readers.« Representing rape in medieval and early modern literature. Edited by Elizabeth Robertson et al. New York 2001: 61-96.

[Info] Beard, Mary. »The Erotics of Rape: Livy, Ovid and the Sabine Women.« Female Networks and the Public Sphere in Roman Society. Edited by P ivi Set l et al. Rome 1999: 1-10.

[Info] Beard, Mary. »The erotics of rape: Livy, Ovid and the Sabine women.« Women in the Classical World. Vol. 1. Edited by Sharon L. James et al. London 2017: 292-308.

[Info] Flores, Romina A. »Sed voluit vinci viribus illa tamen: Primeras aproximaciones al lexema stuprum en Ovidio.« Cuadernos de Literatura No. 14 (2020): 15-26.

[Info] Gloyn, Liz. »The classical pedagogy of trigger warnings.« Classically Inclined (January 21, 2014).

[Info] Gloyn, Liz. »The Problematic Ovid lecture.« Classically Inclined (February 21, 2014).

[Info] James, Sharon L. »Slave-Rape and Female Silence in Ovids Love Poetry.« Helios 24 (1997): 60-76.

[Info] Jones, Prudence J. »Aversion reversed. Ovid s Pomona and her Roman models.« Classical world 94 (2001): 361-376.

[Info] Murgatroyd, Paul. »Plotting in Ovidian rape narratives.« Eranos 98 (2000): 75-92.

[Info] Ranger, Holly. »Why are we Still Reading Ovid's rapes?« Revisiting Rape in Antiquity: Sexualised Violence in Greek and Roman Worlds London 2023: 33-47.

[Info] Richlin, Amy. »Reading Ovid s rapes.« Pornography and representation in Greece and Rome. Edited by Amy Richlin. New York 1992: 158-179.

II. Speaker Index

[Info] Beck, Anna E. »Rape and the Word paelex: Agency and Opprobrium.« Ancient Rape Cultures: Greek, Roman, Jewish, Christian: International Conference Rome 2022.

[Info] McAdams, Alexander L. »Enraptured: Reading Ovidian Sexual Violence in Early Modern Literature.« Our Voices: A Conference for Inclusive Classics Pedagogy. New York 2020.

[Info] Murgatroyd, Paul. »Rape narratives in Ovid.« The Classical Association Annual Conference. Liverpool 1999.

[Info] Nichols, Kate. »Bodies Changed to Other Forms: Ovid and the Visual Language of Seduction and Rape in 1890s Manchester.« Taking Liberties: Sex, Pleasure, Coercion (1748-1928). Newcastle upon Tyne 2012.



Amores

I n f o r m a t i o n

»Amores is Ovid's first completed book of poetry, written in elegiac couplets. It was first published in 16 BC in five books, but Ovid, by his own account, later edited it down into the three-book edition that survives today. The book follows the popular model of the erotic elegy, as made famous by figures such as Tibullus or Propertius, but is often subversive and humorous with these tropes, exaggerating common motifs and devices to the point of absurdity.« -- More information: Wikipedia


K e y w o r d s

I. Chronological Index: Ancient History: Roman History | I. Geographical Index: European History: Italian History | III. Topical Index: Cases: Fictional Victims: Corinna, Cypassis; Types: Rape; Offenders: Social Status: Noblemen


1. Sexual Abuse of Corinna

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] De Boer, Katherine R. Verbera, Catenae, Concubitus: Slaves, Violence and Vulnerability in Ovid's Amores. M.A. Thesis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2010.

[Info] Marturano, Melissa K. Vim Parat: Patterns of Sexualized Violence, Victim-Blaming, and Sororophobia in Ovid. Ph.D. Thesis, City University of New York, 2017.

II. Speaker Index

[Info] Wise, Jessica. »Subaltern Women, Sexual Violence, and Trauma in Ovid's AmoresDepartment of Classics, University of Colorado. Boulder 2018.

[Info] Wise, Jessica. »Subaltern Women, Sexual Violence, and Trauma in Ovid's Amores114th Annual Meeting of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South. Albuquerque 2018.


2. Sexual Abuse of Cypassis

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] De Boer, Katherine R. Verbera, Catenae, Concubitus: Slaves, Violence and Vulnerability in Ovid's Amores. M.A. Thesis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2010.

[Info] James, Sharon L. »Slave-rape and Female Silence in Ovid's Love Poety.« Women in the Classical World. Vol. 4. Edited by Sharon L. James et al. London 2017: 420-434.

[Info] Marturano, Melissa K. Vim Parat: Patterns of Sexualized Violence, Victim-Blaming, and Sororophobia in Ovid. Ph.D. Thesis, City University of New York, 2017.

[Info] Marturano, Melissa. »Sororophobia in Ovid.« Revisiting Rape in Antiquity: Sexualised Violence in Greek and Roman Worlds. Edited by Susan Deacy et al. London 2023: 200-211.

II. Speaker Index

[Info] Wise, Jessica. »Subaltern Women, Sexual Violence, and Trauma in Ovid's AmoresDepartment of Classics, University of Colorado. Boulder 2018.

[Info] Wise, Jessica. »Subaltern Women, Sexual Violence, and Trauma in Ovid's Amores114th Annual Meeting of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South. Albuquerque 2018.


2. Rape of Rhea Silvia by Anio

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Marturano, Melissa K. Vim Parat: Patterns of Sexualized Violence, Victim-Blaming, and Sororophobia in Ovid. Ph.D. Thesis, City University of New York, 2017.

II. Speaker Index

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Ars Amatoria

I n f o r m a t i o n

»The Ars amatoria (The Art of Love) is an instructional elegy series in three books by the ancient Roman poet Ovid. It was written in 2 AD. « -- More information: Wikipedia


K e y w o r d s

I. Chronological Index: Ancient History: Roman History | I. Geographical Index: European History: Italian History | III. Topical Index: Cases: Mythological Incidents: Rape of the Sabine Women; Mythological Victims: Ariadne; Types: Rape; Victims: Social Status: Noblewomen


1. Rape of Ariadne

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Ashmore, Molly. Rape Culture in Ancient Rome. Senior Honors Thesis, Connecticut College, 2015.

[Info] Keramida, Despina. The Re-Imagination of a Letter-Writer and the De-Construction of an Ovidian Rape Narrative at Ars Amatoria 1.527-64. Classica et Mediaevalia 67 (2019): 153-187.

[Info] Marturano, Melissa K. Vim Parat: Patterns of Sexualized Violence, Victim-Blaming, and Sororophobia in Ovid. Ph.D. Thesis, City University of New York, 2017.

[Info] Marturano, Melissa. »Sororophobia in Ovid.« Revisiting Rape in Antiquity: Sexualised Violence in Greek and Roman Worlds. Edited by Susan Deacy et al. London 2023: 200-211.

II. Speaker Index

[Info] Mudie, Lucy. »Blurred Lines: The Rape Culture of Ovid's Ars AmatoriaAncient Rape Cultures: Greek, Roman, Jewish, Christian: International Conference Rome 2022.


2. Rape of the Sabine Women

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Dutton, Jacqueline. The Rape of the Sabine Women: Ovid Ars Amatoria, Book I: 101-134. M.A. Thesis, University of Johannesburg, 2005.

[Info] Wardman, A.E. Rapes of the Sabines (Ovid, Ars Amatoria 1. 89 ff). The Classical Quarterly 15 (1965): 101-103.

II. Speaker Index

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Fasti

I n f o r m a t i o n

»The Fasti (Latin: Fāstī [faːstiː], "the Calendar"), sometimes translated as The Book of Days or On the Roman Calendar, is a six-book Latin poem written by the Roman poet Ovid and published in AD 8. Ovid is believed to have left the Fasti incomplete when he was exiled to Tomis by the emperor Augustus in 8 AD. Written in elegiac couplets and drawing on conventions of Greek and Latin didactic poetry, the Fasti is structured as a series of eye-witness reports and interviews by the first-person vates ("poet-prophet" or "bard") with Roman deities, who explain the origins of Roman holidays and associated customs—often with multiple aetiologies. The poem is a significant, and in some cases unique, source of fact in studies of religion in ancient Rome; and the influential anthropologist and ritualist J.G. Frazer translated and annotated the work for the Loeb Classical Library series. Each book covers one month, January through June, of the Roman calendar, and was written several years after Julius Caesar replaced the old system of Roman time-keeping with what would come to be known as the Julian calendar.« -- More information: Wikipedia


K e y w o r d s

I. Chronological Index: Ancient History: Roman History | I. Geographical Index: European History: Italian History | III. Topical Index: Cases: Mythological Offenders: Faunus, Janus, Jupiter, Mars, Mercury, Priapus, Sextus Tarquinius, Zephyrus; Mythological Victims: Callisto, Carna, Chloris, Lara, Lucretia, Omphale, Proserpina, Rhea Silvia, Vesta; Types: Rape; Offenders: Biological Status: Gods; Social Status: Noblemen; Victims: Biological Status: Gods; Social Status: Noblewomen


1. General

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Ashmore, Molly. Rape Culture in Ancient Rome. Senior Honors Thesis, Connecticut College, 2015.

[Info] Beek, A. Everett. Gendering Anna Perenna. 148th Annual Meeting of the Society for Classical Studies. Toronto 2017.

[Info] Frazel, Thomas D. Priapus s two rapes in Ovid s Fasti. Arethusa 36 (2003): 61-97.

[Info] Marturano, Melissa K. Sororophobia in Ovid's corpus: Blame, punishment, and violence. Rape in Antiquity: 20 years on. London 2017.

[Info] Marturano, Melissa K. Vim Parat: Patterns of Sexualized Violence, Victim-Blaming, and Sororophobia in Ovid. Ph.D. Thesis, City University of New York, 2017.

[Info] Mckay, A. Rape or romance? Sexual violence and the lust for power in Ovid s Fasti. Master Thesis, University of Tasmania, 2016.

[Info] Murgatroyd, Paul. Mythical and legendary narrative in Ovid s Fasti. Leiden 2005.


2. Rape of Callisto by Jupiter

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Beek, Anna E. Always Look on the Bright Side of Death: Violence, Death, and Supernatural Transformation in Ovid's Fasti. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Minnesota, 2015.

[Info] Dolansky, Fanny. Rape, the Family, and the Father of the Fatherland in Ovid Fasti 2. Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle. Edited by Alison Keith et al. Toronto 2016: 39-58.


3. Rape of Carna by Janus

B i b l i o g r a p h y

[Info] Beek, Anna E. Always Look on the Bright Side of Death: Violence, Death, and Supernatural Transformation in Ovid's Fasti. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Minnesota, 2015.


4. Rape of Chloris by Zephyrus

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Beek, Anna A. Rape and Reconciliation: Flora in the Fasti. 110th Annual Meeting of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South. Waco 2014.

[Info] Beek, Anna E. Always Look on the Bright Side of Death: Violence, Death, and Supernatural Transformation in Ovid's Fasti. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Minnesota, 2015.


5. Rape of Lara by Mercury

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Beek, Anna E. Always Look on the Bright Side of Death: Violence, Death, and Supernatural Transformation in Ovid's Fasti. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Minnesota, 2015.

[Info] Dolansky, Fanny. Rape, the Family, and the Father of the Fatherland in Ovid Fasti 2. Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle. Edited by Alison Keith et al. Toronto 2016: 39-58.


6. Rape of Lucretia by Sextus Tarquinius

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Dolansky, Fanny. Rape, the Family, and the Father of the Fatherland in Ovid Fasti 2. Roman Literary Cultures: Domestic Politics, Revolutionary Poetics, Civic Spectacle. Edited by Alison Keith et al. Toronto 2016: 39-58.

[Info] Glendinning, Eleanor R. Guilt, Redemption and Reception: Representing Roman Female Suicide. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Nottingham, 2011.

[Info] Newlands, Carole E. Ovid's Rape of Lucretia in the Fasti. Augustan Age 2 (1988): 36-44.


7. Rape of Omphale by Faunus

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Hejduk, Julia D. Epic Rapes in the Fasti. Classical Philology 106 (2011): 20-31.


8. Rape of Persephone / Proserpina

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Beek, Anna E. Always Look on the Bright Side of Death: Violence, Death, and Supernatural Transformation in Ovid's Fasti. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Minnesota, 2015.

[Info] Hejduk, Julia D. Epic Rapes in the Fasti. Classical Philology 106 (2011): 20-31.

[Info] Jones, Brandon. The Rhetoric of Rape: Claudian, Ovid and the Significance of Legalistic Discourse in Proserpine Poetics. 110th Annual Meeting of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South. Waco 2014.


9. Rape of Rhea Silvia by Mars

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Beek, Anna E. Always Look on the Bright Side of Death: Violence, Death, and Supernatural Transformation in Ovid's Fasti. Ph.D. Thesis, University of Minnesota, 2015.

[Info] Kindick, Samuel L. (Re)writing Rape: Fasti 3.9-44. 111th Annual Meeting of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South. Boulder 2015.

[Info] Radiminski, Maricel. Marte y Rea Silvia: Historia de una genealog a (Ov. Fast. 3.9-70). Anales de Filolog a Cl sica No. 26 (2013): 63-78.


10. Rape of Vesta by Priapus

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Frazel, Thomas D. Is Fasti 6.319ff. a "Comic" Rape? 127th Annual Meeting of the American Philological Association. San Diego 1995.



Heroides

I n f o r m a t i o n

»« -- More information: Wikipedia

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Marturano, Melissa K. Vim Parat: Patterns of Sexualized Violence, Victim-Blaming, and Sororophobia in Ovid. Ph.D. Thesis, City University of New York, 2017.



Metamorphoses

I n f o r m a t i o n

»The Metamorphoses (Latin: Metamorphōsēs, from Ancient Greek: μεταμορφώσεις: "Transformations") is a Latin narrative poem from 8 CE by the Roman poet Ovid. It is considered his magnum opus. The poem chronicles the history of the world from its creation to the deification of Julius Caesar in a mythico-historical framework comprising over 250 myths, 15 books, and 11,995 lines. « -- More information: Wikipedia


Cases: Mythological Offenders: Poseidon, Pyreneus, Salmacis, Tereus, Vertumnus; Mythological Victims: Caenis, Hermaphroditus, Philomela, Pomona, Proserpina


1. General

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Bloch, Nikki. Patterns of Rape in Ovid's Metamorphoses. Undergraduate Honors Thesis, University of Colorado at Boulder, 2014.

[Info] Bowen, Megan. E. Patterns of Prayer: for Help in Ovid s Metamorphoses and the Suppressed Rape of Lavinia. 149th Annual Meeting of the Society for Classical Studies. Boston 2018.

[Info] Christine, Jenna. »Old Myths Through New Eyes: Re-Appropriation of Ovid’s Metamorphoses.« The University of Colorado Honors Journal (2024): 118-119.

[Info] Curran, Leo C. Rape and rape victims in the Metamorphoses. Arethusa 11 (1978): 213-241.

[Info] Gamel, Mary-Kay. Re-reading Ovid s Rapes. 148th Annual Meeting of the Society for Classical Studies. Toronto 2017.

[Info] Gloyn, Elizabeth. Reading Rape in Ovid's Metamorphoses: A Test-Case Lesson. Classical World 106 (2013): 675-681.

[Info] Gosselin, Cheryl A. Rape, Seduction and Love in Ovid's Metamorphoses. M.A. Thesis, Concordia University, 1990.

[Info] James, Sharon. Rape and Repetition, Myth and History: Repeated Structures in Ovid's Metamorphoses. Repetition in Ovid's Metamorphoses. Tallahassee 2013.

[Info] James, Sharon L. Rape and Repetition in Ovid's Metamorphoses: Myth, History, Structure, Rome. Repeat Performances: Ovidian Repetition and the Metamorphoses. Edited by Laural Fulkerson et al. Madison 2016: 154-175.

[Info] Kahn, Madeleine. Why Are We Reading Ovid s Handbook on Rape? Teaching and Learning at a Women s College. Boulder 2005.

[Info] Kahn, Madeleine. Why Are We Reading Ovid s Handbook on Rape? Teaching and Learning at a Women s College. New York 2016.

[Info] Koenig, Amy. Pantomime Performance and Sexual Violence in Ovid s Metamorphoses. Annual Meeting of the Classical Assocation of the Atlantic States. Silver Spring 2019.

[Info] La Londe, Danielle. Gendered Violence and Genre in Ovid's Metamorphoses and George Miller's Mad Max: Fury Road . 114th Annual Meeting of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South. Albuquerque 2018.

[Info] Lillie, Celene. The Rulers' Rape of Eve: Sexual Violence and Subjugation, Transformation and Resistance in Roman History, Myth and Three Retellings of Genesis 1-6. Ph.D. Thesis, Union Theological Seminary, 2016.

[Info] Marturano, Melissa K. Vim Parat: Patterns of Sexualized Violence, Victim-Blaming, and Sororophobia in Ovid. Ph.D. Thesis, City University of New York, 2017.

[Info] McPhee, Brian D. (Adhvc) virginevsqve Helicon: A Subtextual Rape in Ovid's Catalogue of Mountains (Met. 2.219). The Classical Quarterly 69 (2019): 769-775.

[Info] Miller, Sarah. Rape and metamorphosis. Reading embodied experience in Ovid s Metamorphoses and Richardson s Clarissa. M.A. Thesis, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2003.

[Info] Marturano, Melissa K. Rapes in Ovid's Metamorphoses: Victim-Precipitation, Victim-Blaming, and Juno. Fall 2011 Meeting of the Classical Association of the Atlantic States. Baltimore 2011.

[Info] Marturano, Melissa K. Sororophobia in Ovid's corpus: Blame, punishment, and violence. Rape in Antiquity: 20 years on. London 2017.

[Info] Oakes, Daylin. Rape Glossed as Robbery: Avoiding or Addressing Difficult Topics in Introductory Latin. Spring 2016 Classics Graduate Student Colloquium. Tucson 2016.

[Info] Oakes, Daylin. Rape Glossed as Robbery: Avoiding or Addressing Difficult Topics in Introductory Latin. 112th Annual Meeting of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South. Williamsburg 2016.

[Info] Parry, Hugh. Ovid s Metamorphoses. Violence in a pastoral landscape. Transactions and proceedings of the American Philological Association 95 (1964): 268-282.

[Info] Pintabone, Diane T. The Incidental Rape in Ovid's Metamorphoses. 128th Annual Meeting of the American Philological Association. New York 1996.

[Info] Pintabone, Diane T. Women and the unspeakable. Rape in Ovid s Metamorphoses. Ann Arbor 1998.

[Info] Rajendran, Shyama. Teaching the Legend of Philomela from Ovid to Gower. 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies. Kalamazoo 2017.

[Info] Stirrup, Barbara E. Techniques of rape. Variety of wit in Ovid s Metamorphoses. Greece & Rome 24 (1977): 170-184.

[Info] Tinkler, K. The Abuse of Patriarchal Power in Rome: The Rape Narratives of Ovid s Metamorphoses. M.A. Thesis, University of Canterbury, 2018.

[Info] Treadway, Tashi. Rape Isn't Merely Metaphorical: A Study of Rape Representations in Receptions of Ovid's "Metamorphoses". Senior Thesis, Princeton University, 2019.

[Info] Westerhold, Jessica. The Dual 'Other' in the Myth of Philomela and Tereus. 102nd Annual Meeting of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South. Gainesville 1996.

[Info] Westerhold, Jessica. Silence and power. The metamorphosis of rape myths in Ovid. Ann Arbor 2006.

[Info] Zissos, Andrew. The Rape of Proserpina in Ovid Met. 5.341-661: Internal Audience and Narrative Distortion. Phoenix 53 (1999): 97-113.


2. Rape of Arachne

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Laseur, Imme. »A Web of Rape: Arachne, Ovid and Sexual Violence in the MetamorphosesAncient Rape Cultures: Greek, Roman, Jewish, Christian: International Conference Rome 2022.


3. Rape by Pyreneus

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Cowan, Robert. A Brutal Hack: Tyranny, Rape, and the Barbarism of Bad Poetry in Ovid's Pyreneus Episode. Antichthon 54 (2020): 80-102.


4. Rape of Caenis by Poseidon

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Cattan-Prugl, Helen. Love, Rape, and Godly Metamorphosis: Gender Mutability in Ancient Roman and Early Modern English Literature. Senior Capstone Project, Vassar College, 2018.

[Info] Musgrove, Margaret W. Caenis: The Metamorphoses' Last Rape Victim. 138th Annual Meeting of the American Philological Association. San Diego 2007.


5. Rape of Hermaphroditus by Salmacis

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Cattan-Prugl, Helen. Love, Rape, and Godly Metamorphosis: Gender Mutability in Ancient Roman and Early Modern English Literature. Senior Capstone Project, Vassar College, 2018.

[Info] Koivunen, Johanna. A Clinging Embrace: A Study of the Female Rapist in Ovid s Metamorphoses. Sj lvst ndigt arbete p grundniv , Stockholm universitet, 2018.


6. Rape of Medusa by Poseidon

B i b l i o g r a p h y

--

Cases: Mythologial Offenders: Poseidon; Mythologial Vitims: Medusa; Types: General: Rape

I. Author Index

[Info] Martorana, Simona. »Re-Enacting Rape: Medusa in Ovid's MetamorphosesAncient Rape Cultures: Greek, Roman, Jewish, Christian: International Conference Rome 2022.


7. Rape of Philomela by Tereus

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Gloyn, Liz. Reading Rape in Ovid's Metamorphoses: A Test-Case Lesson. 141st Annual Meeting of the American Philological Association. Anaheim 2010.

[Info] Joshi, Aditi, et al. »Philomela's Tapestry and #MeToo: Reading Ovid in an Indian Feminist Classroom.« #MeToo and Literary Studies: Reading, Writing, and Teaching about Sexual Violence and Rape Culture. New York 2021: 135- .

[Info] Panoussi, Vassiliki. Rape, Ritual, and Trauma: Ovid's Philomela Reconsidered (Ovid's Metamorphoses 6.424-674). Emotional Trauma in Greek and Roman Culture: Representations and Reactions.


8. Rape of Pomona by Vertumnus

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Matz, Alicia. Rape, Apotheosis and Politics in Metamorphoses 14 and 15. Fall 2016 Meeting of the Classical Association of the Atlantic States. New Brunswick 2016.

[Info] Matz, Alicia. Rape, apotheosis, and politics in Metamorphoses 14 and 15. Rape in Antiquity: 20 years on. London 2017.

[Info] Novelli, Daniela. omnia turbasti : Die Tereus - Episode bei Ovid und Ransmayr. Diplomarbeit, Universit t Wien, 2020.


9. Rape of Proserpina

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Jones, Brandon. The Rhetoric of Rape: Claudian, Ovid and the Significance of Legalistic Discourse in Proserpine Poetics. 110th Annual Meeting of the Classical Association of the Middle West and South. Waco 2014.


10. Rape of Syrinx by Pan

B i b l i o g r a p h y

I. Author Index

[Info] Chilianis, Melanie. Re-embodying Syrinx in the ancient Peloponnese and French colonial Belle poque: Investigating bodily change associated with sexual assault. European Journal of Women's Studies (September 19, 2020).